Latest Posts

  •     VOLUNTEER!Swim Guide is in full swing at Sound Rivers, and we still need some volunteers to collect water samples and deliver them to our summer water-quality interns. Learn more about what it means to volunteer here!     TUNE IN!Every week we send out eNews with updates about

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  • Host your own “A Sound River” screening

    Did you miss Sound Rivers’ 40th-anniversary documentary when it premiered Nov. 30, 2021? We had an estimated 500 people attend the virtual premiere, and if you weren’t one of them, you can see it now by hosting your own “A Sound River” screening.  Email us for the link at info@soundrivers.org,

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  • Waterkeepers Carolina conference 2022

    Neuse Riverkeeper Samantha Krop and Pamlico-Tar Riverkeeper Jill Howell joined fellow North Carolina Riverkeepers this week in Charlotte for the Waterkeepers Carolina conference. After a day of discussion about advocacy and issues affecting NC rivers, Riverkeepers headed out on kayaks  to explore (and take a dip in) the Catawba River.

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  • Mystery solved: mussels are non-invasive

    Recently, a woman who lives on the Neuse reached out to Sound Rivers regarding the appearance of a lot of mussels in the river over the past two summers — she was concerned they are an invasive species. Sound Rivers reached out to the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries,

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  • SCOTUS ruling a setback for clean water

    Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling on an EPA case could ultimately limit the agency’s ability to do its job to address climate change. Read about the decision in this New York Times article. Sound Rivers staff is extremely disappointed in decision. Sound Rivers’ Executive Director Heather Deck “This is deeply,

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  • Algal bloom season is here

    Summer means hot days, backyard barbecues and days spent on the river. For us at Sound Rivers, though, it can mean algal blooms. Drought conditions across eastern North Carolina through much of winter and spring can mean higher concentration of nutrients enter the waterways through runoff when it does rain. Algal

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  • Trash Trout gets a second clean-out

    The Jack’s Creek Trash Trout in Washington got its second clean-out this week. On Wednesday, volunteers joined Lower Neuse water-quality intern Megan Long and Tar-Pamlico intern Maddie Garrison to remove trash from the litter trap, then audit what it had trapped since its last clean-out on May 20. This outing’s

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