Tag: Michael Baker International

Swim Guide

April 7, 2022

Swim Guide

Get your weekly water quality alerts here!

swim guide here

Want to get weekly water quality alerts straight to your phone? Text “SWIM” to 833-686-5322!

EN ESPAÑOL 

Sound Rivers’ Neuse and Pamlico-Tar Riverkeepers work with interns and volunteers to monitor water quality sites in the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico watersheds. Our sites are sampled weekly from late May through the end of August. Sites are monitored for E. coli bacteria in freshwater and enterococci bacteria in salt water.

CONDITIONS ON

May 24, 2024

Be sure to check in on this page every Friday afternoon through the summer to get the latest water-quality results!

UPPER NEUSE

All sites passed on the Upper Neuse. However, Hickory Hill, Beaver Dam, Ledge Rock and Rolling View boating access sites on Falls Lake were not tested this week.

LOWER NEUSE

The only site that failed this week on the Lower Neuse was Slocum Creek. Read more on Slocum Creek’s issues here.

Brice’s Creek in Oriental was not tested this week.

TAR-PAMLICO

All sites passed on the Tar-Pamlico.

Plum Point in Bath was not tested this week.

Get Swim Guide Results

Swim Guide volunteers sample each site on Thursdays throughout the summer and results are available by Friday afternoon. They will be posted to this page, can be found at the Swim Guide website, using the app, on our Facebook page, and will be announced on Public Radio East between 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. each Friday. You can also get the results via weekly text alerts during the summer — just text SWIM to 833-686-5322 to join our text alert list!

Like the Swim Guide? Donate here to help keep the Swim Guide alive!

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Water Quality Criteria

Sound Rivers uses the North Carolina and EPA water-quality criteria for contact recreation. Sites are marked green when the last sample was at healthy levels of bacteria. Sites are marked red when the last sample was above the criteria, or unhealthy levels of bacteria. Sites are marked grey when there are no current results or there is no available information.

E. coli is a type of bacteria found in the intestines of people and other animals, and is a good indicator of recent fecal contamination. While most types of these bacteria are harmless, some types can make us sick or cause more severe gastrointestinal issues in more sensitive groups.

The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality’s Division of Marine Fisheries Recreational Water Quality Program does additional testing in the region. Those results are also incorporated into the sites listed on the Swim Guide website and app.

Thanks so much to our Sponsors, who are helping us bring you

the Summer of 2024 Swim Guide!

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Protection

April 7, 2022

Protection

On a daily basis, our two Riverkeepers monitor the health of the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico watersheds and ecosystems. We serve as investigators, advocates and educators who partner with conservationists and concerned citizens to be hands-on activists protecting the health and beauty of our natural resources.

One of North Carolina’s Original Conservation Groups
Our staff has decades of experience in advocacy roles for the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico Rivers. The organization was founded by concerned citizens like you who care about the health and beauty of our waterways. We’ve been protecting our cherished rivers since 1980.

Our Riverkeepers monitor the health of the rivers and ecosystems in our communities. We investigate polluters, advocate for enforcement of existing laws, and demonstrate conservation techniques that protect the health of our natural resources.

The Dangers of Polluters Run Amuck
Sound Rivers often has to use strategic action to stop pollution and promote policies that will protect infograph_defend_sound-rivers_022616the rivers and watersheds. Too often the local, state and federal government agencies charged with enforcing our environmental laws are unable or unwilling to take critical enforcement actions, often because of lack of adequate resources or the potential for political or legal backlash.

As much as possible, we prefer to resolve matters through negotiation and cooperation without resorting to litigation. Typically, we’re able to resolve problems through communication. Our establish working relationships with industry, government and civic groups enables Sound Rivers to serve as a resource for water quality and environmental issues. We’re not only the voice for our rivers, but an ally to protect and restore our waterways.

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Contact Us

April 7, 2022

Contact Us

info@soundrivers.org

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Locations

WASHINGTON (OFFICE)
108 Gladden St.
Washington, NC 27889
252.946.7211

WASHINGTON (MAILING)
PO Box 1854
Washington, NC 27889

NEW BERN
2207 Trent Road
New Bern, NC 28560
252.637.7972

RALEIGH
19 Hargett St.
Raleigh, NC 27601
919.856.1180

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Report A Problem

April 7, 2022

Report A Problem

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Recreation

April 7, 2022

Recreation

On The Water

Sound Rivers represents the interests of its thousands of members, as well as everyone who recognizes the waterways of eastern North Carolina as the amazing assets they are. We care about the future of our rivers, streams and waterways because they sustain us humans and the nature we so enjoy. 

They also support plenty of opportunities for recreation. From the Piedmont to the Pamlico Sound, here are some of the ways you can enjoy your rivers.

Wildlife Resources Commission

Explore our state’s beautiful wildlife and map out the best boat ramp locations for your next trip. The Wildlife Resources Commission is a wonderful place to begin researching your next journey.

Mountain-to-Sea Trail Guide

Explore how the Mountain-to-Sea Trail intersects with the Neuse River. Use these links to plan your next hiking adventure along our favorite rivers. The Mountain-to-Sea Trial Guide is a great resource, or you can also enjoy our convenient paddle map of the Neuse.

Tar-Pamlico Water Trail

Learn all about the hiking, campsites, camping platforms and fun activities in North Carolina’s Tar-Pamlico basin. The Tar-Pamlico Water Trail website is wealth of information. Owned and operated by Sound Rivers, these camping platforms provide overnight facilities to recreational users on the river (cost is $20 per night).

The goal is to build a continuous system of platforms approximately 8 to 15 miles apart, spanning from the headwaters of the Tar River in Granville County to the wide-open, estuarine waters of the Pamlico River in Beaufort, Hyde and Pamlico counties.

The platforms are open to the public. You can choose to sleep under the stars or in a screened-in enclosure along the scenic Tar River in the central and eastern part of the state. Enjoy white-water paddling in the headwaters and sea kayaking along the Inner Banks.

Recreational paddlers, boaters and fishermen are welcome to use the facilities year-round, though use is by permit only. All you need to do is reserve your spot.

Just want to take a walk along on the water? Sit a spell and watch the wildlife? Here’s a few places you can enjoy your waterways from land: 

In the Tar-Pamlico watershed: Joyner Park, Louisburg; River Bend Park, Louisburg; Battle Park, Rocky Mount; Bridge Tar River Trail, Rocky Mount; Riverfront Park, Tarboro; Town Common/Tar River Greenway, Greenville; Wildwood Park, Greenville; Festival Park/boardwalk, Washington; Havens Gardens Park, Washington; Goose Creek State Park, Washington; Belhaven Beach, Belhaven; Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge, Hyde County.

In the Neuse watershed: Little River Park, Zebulon; Wake County — Rolling View State Recreation Area, Falls Lake State Recreation Area, Beaverdam Lake State Recreation Area, Holly Point Campground State Recreation Area, Shinleaf Campground State Recreation Area, Blue Jay Point County Park, Forest Ridge Park, Falls Lake Dam Recreation Area; Neuse River Greenway; River Bend Park, Horseshoe Farm Nature Preserve; Milburnie Park; Anderson Point Park; Capital Area Greenway, Robertson Mill Pond Preserve and Mitchell Mill State Natural Area, Little River Park; Clayton Riverwalk on the Neuse Greenway, Clayton; Smithfield Town Commons; 

Old Waynesboro Park, Goldsboro; Cliffs of the Neuse State Park, Seven Springs; Neuseway Nature Park, Kinston; Glenburnie Park, New Bern; Town of Bridgeton Park, Bridgeton; Union Point Park, New Bern; Lawson Creek Park, New Bern; John Bond Town Beach, Oriental; Lou Mac Park, Oriental.

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Restoration

April 7, 2022

Restoration

Landscaping for Water Quality

When rain falls in a natural setting, it’s naturally filtered — through soils and groundwater or soaked up by vegetation. When land is developed, however, impervious surfaces (roads, rooftops, driveways, parking lots) prevent that filtering, which can lead to erosion in some places, flooding in others, and does lead to rainwater full of pollutants — suspended solids, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), heavy metals, toxic organic pollutants and petroleum compounds — running directly into your waterways.

To deal with the increased problems from polluted stormwater runoff, Sound Rivers began a restoration program of on-the-ground projects to restore water quality in 2010. Since — courtesy of the state Environmental Enhancement Grant Program — we’ve partnered with many grade schools and community colleges across the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico watersheds to resolve their stormwater runoff issues in a variety of ways.

Rain
Gardens
Constructed
Wetlands
Rainwater
Harvesters

Rain Gardens

Rain gardens are landscaped depressions that collect stormwater runoff, then allow the runoff to slowly infiltrate to the ground-water table. A rain garden cuts down on localized flooding and allows nature to remove some of the pollutants otherwise affecting downstream water quality. During infiltration, plants use excess nutrients for growth, sediment is trapped in the garden and biological and physical processes remove pollution. Rain gardens also create important habitat for bees, butterflies, birds and other wildlife.

Constructed Wetlands

A constructed wetland is exactly what it sounds like: a manmade wetland that mimics the processes of the natural kind. Constructed wetlands collect and temporarily store stormwater runoff, reducing and stabilizing flow to adjacent natural wetlands and streams.

The bonus is — just like with natural wetlands — sediment settles and multiple pollutants are taken up and transformed by wetland plants and microbes, which reduces the number of pollutants entering your groundwater and waterways.

Rainwater Harvesters

A rainwater harvester is a fancy name for “a tank collecting rain from a rooftop.” One of the impervious surfaces we don’t often think of is, quite literally, above our heads. During a hard rain, rooftops can sluice off tens of thousands of gallons of water, but a rainwater harvester collects that runoff which then becomes a non-potable water source to be used for a variety of purposes, including irrigation of vegetables in raised beds (West Craven High School) and watering a football field (Epiphany School).

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Education

April 7, 2022

Education


One of the ways Sound Rivers serves our communities and the public is as experts on the ecosystems of the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico watersheds. We pride ourselves on working with statewide media, government officials, teachers, civic organizations and other nonprofit organizations to help educate about the issues facing our waterways.

MEET YOUR RIVERKEEPER

Nature is our classroom and our teachings combine real-world scenarios and hands-on activism within the local environment. Topics our Riverkeepers often cover during presentations include:

  • River ecosystems
  • Wetland ecosystems
  • Stormwater pollution and response
  • Coastal and estuarine ecosystems
  • Human impacts to water quality



We’re always happy to be a resource for teachers and provide programs tailored to lesson plans. We’ve worked within schools throughout the basin, supporting science and math curricula and inspiring young minds to connect concept to reality through water science.

There’s nothing like experiencing nature to help kids get the basics of water ecosystems and issues. We work closely with teachers to lead curriculum-based programs, events and presentations that build students’ knowledge and understanding. Get in touch today to discuss classroom opportunities!

Almost all educational programs and visits by one of our two Riverkeepers and our stormwater program director are free, but donations are always welcome. As a nonprofit conservation organization, Sound Rivers exists thanks to support from area residents.

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Natural Setting

April 7, 2022



Tag: Michael Baker International


The Neuse and Tar-Pamlico watersheds comprise 12,000 square miles and cover nearly one-fourth of the land area in North Carolina. They are among the most heavily used water resources in the state.

Sound-Rivers-Neuse-Tar-Pamlico

Tar-Pamlico River

The Tar River begins as a freshwater stream in the Piedmont near Roxboro, rising east to meet the Pamlico River near Washington, N.C. to drain into the Pamlico Sound before meeting the Atlantic Ocean. Major tributaries in the upper basin include Swift, Fishing and Tranters creeks and Cokey Swamp, as well as Pungo River in the lower basin. It also includes Lake Mattamuskeet, at more than 18 miles long and 6 miles wide, it is the largest natural lake in the state and home to Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge.

Neuse River

The longest river in North Carolina, the Neuse River Basin stretches 248 miles from the Falls Lake Reservoir Dam in the Piedmont to its mouth at the Pamlico Sound and the state’s original capital at New Bern. At its mouth, six miles across, it’s the widest river in America and our nation’s second largest estuary. Major tributaries include Crabtree, Swift and Contentnea creeks and the Eno, Little and Trent rivers. The Neuse River Basin is a critically important body of water for nearly one-sixth of the state’s population.

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Projects

April 7, 2022



Projects


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