• Why Small Streams are Important

    There has been a move over the past several years by leadership at the North Carolina General Assembly to roll back protections for small streams. Conservation groups all agree these attacks will be back this session. While small streams (those that your child could jump across) may seem meaningless to overall water quality, they are […]

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  • Building Partners to Reduce Stormwater Pollution

    Polluted stormwater runoff, including sediment from poorly maintained construction sites, is the number one reason for poor water quality in North Carolina. Your Sound Rivers staff have been hard at work to build local partners in an effort to curb our growing stormwater pollution problem. Sediment can cause severe problems for creeks, rivers and estuaries […]

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  • Volunteer Opportunity: Help Study “Zombie” Crabs!

    Did you see Chris Moore’s article on Zombie Crabs, here? You can help Dr. Blakeslee, Associate Professor of Biology at ECU, and her students determine if crabs have a refuge from infection when occupying low- salinity waters that are less beneficial to the parasite. Dr. Blakeslee and her students are looking for volunteers to help […]

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  • Questions Remain on Duke Energy Coal Ash Pits

    By Matthew Starr, Upper Neuse Riverkeeper In 2016, Sound Rivers secured an important legal victory to ensure that the coal ash currently stored in unlined pits along the Neuse River in Goldsboro would be removed by Duke Energy. As part of that removal process, Duke Energy is required to obtain a wastewater discharge permit from […]

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  • Volunteer Spotlight: Ed Rhine

    By Heather Deck, Pamlico-Tar Riverkeeper When you hear the term “labor of love” many images may come to mind. For me, this saying is defined best in the past year by Sound Rivers member, Blounts Creek activist, and volunteer Ed Rhine. Within the Blounts Creek Community, I have found water activists with the type of […]

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  • The Rise of “Zombie Crabs”

    By Chris Moore, ECU, Dept. of Biology Over the past ~60 years, native mud crabs in estuaries along the US east coast have been greatly impacted by an invasive parasite; a highly modified barnacle, specifically adapted to infect certain species of crabs. The parasite, Loxothylacus panopaei (“Loxo” for short), is native to the Gulf of […]

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